Revology Cars recently announced that it would add a 1968 Mustang 2+2 Fastback to its line of replica Mustangs. Built with choice aftermarket parts and built on an OE-style assembly line, these reimagined Mustangs deliver classic looks with modern driving dynamics. (Photo Credit: Revology Cars)

Revology Cars recently announced that it would add a 1968 Mustang 2+2 Fastback to its line of replica Mustangs. Built with choice aftermarket parts and built on an OE-style assembly line, these reimagined Mustangs deliver classic looks with modern driving dynamics. (Photo Credit: Revology Cars)

If you are into classic Mustangs, you have undoubtedly heard of Revology Cars. Spearheaded by former Ford Special Vehicle Team marketing guru, Tom Scarpello, the company builds classic Mustang replicas using modern technology and OEM-style production techniques. Yesterday at the Amelia Island Concours in Amelia Island, Florida, the company announced a new replica offering—a 1968 Mustang 2+2 Fastback.

We are expanding our capacity and developing new models… — Tom Scarpello, Revology

While rumors of a modern Bullitt Mustang based on the 2018 Mustang continue to swirl, there is now no doubt you can order a modernized version of Lt. Frank Bullitt’s ride from the company based in Orlando, Florida.

“We are expanding our capacity and developing new models,” Tom explained. “We invested significant resources in the development of our 1964.5-1970 Mustang platform, and will leverage that investment by rolling out new versions over time.”

Those versions also include 1966 GT Convertible, a 1966 GT 2+2 Fastback, a 1966 Shelby GT350 and a 1967 Shelby GT500. These vehicles are built based on new, reproduction bodies assembled with interior, powertrain and suspension gear that delivers modern performance and driveability.

When you build 20 1966 Mustangs in a row, you get pretty good at it.—Tom Scarpello, Revology

“The way we develop and build cars is not that different from Ford, GM, or other automakers. I liken it to the difference between a Cessna 152 and a Gulfstream business jet. Although one is vastly more sophisticated, they both operate on the same basic principles,” Tom said. “When you build 20 1966 Mustangs in a row, you get pretty good at it.”

Those Mustangs are built with all new parts, including double-wishbone front suspensions, three-link rear suspensions, torque arms, Panhard bars, four-wheel power disc brakes, power rack and pinion steering and more.

All Revology replica Mustangs are built with carefully selected components—like Eaton differentials, Ford Performance Coyote engines, and Total Cost Involved suspensions—to deliver modern driving dynamics.

1968 Mustang Standard Equipment

Exterior

• New, Ford-licensed steel body

• Halogen headlamps

• LED park and reverse lamps

• LED taillights w/ sequential turn signals

• GT foglamps

• GT dual exhaust w/ quad tips

• GT fuel cap

• GT fender badges

• GT side stripe

• LED courtesy lighting

• 16×8-inch Magnum 500 aluminum wheels

• BFGoodrich G-force Sport Comp 2 high-performance tires, 225/50ZR-16

• Remote driver side mirror

• Convex passenger side mirror

• Hidden antenna

• Safety/security

• Three-point seat belts

• Dual circuit braking system

• Collapsible steering shaft

• Fuel pump inertia switch

• 16-gallon steel trunk floor

• Rolling code encrypted ignition switch

Functional

• Ford Performance 5.0-liter Ti-VCT Coyote V8 w/ 435 horsepower and 400 lb-ft of torque

• Power four-wheel disc brakes w/ ventilated rotors

• Power rack and pinion steering

• Unequal length control arm front suspension

• Total Cost Involved three-link rear suspension w/ torque arm and Panhard rod

• Single adjustable coilover shocks

• Ford 9-inch w/ 31-spline rear, 3.50 ratio

• Eaton TrueTrac limited-slip differential

• Electronic parking brake

• Emergency tire inflation kit

“By far the largest investment involves making the car run and drive like a modern car. Making it look pretty is relatively easy,” Tom added.

Building a car that drives well is great, but the Revology rides definitely deliver that classic Mustang swagger too.

“It looks like an original, but most of the functional parts in a Revology car were designed in CAD,” Nathan Loucks, Revology’s product development manager, said. “The only things in common with the original are the look and sound. Under the skin, it is truly a modern car.”

Of course, as we mentioned, you can’t think about a classic ’68 Fastback without thinking of Steve McQueen tearing through the streets in his mean, green machine. Clearly, the Revology gang is cognizant of that lineage, as they were clear to point out an important option on the list for the company’s latest replica Mustang.

“Of course, it will be available in Highland Green, the same color as the car in the movie,” Tom added.

So, even if Ford doesn’t build a new Bullitt, you’ll still be able to buy a Coyote-powered, Bullitt-era ’Stang from Revology starting at $165,000. For more on this new offering and the company’s other replica rides, check out the official site here.